Mindful gratitude journaling: psychological distress, quality of life and suffering in advanced cancer: a randomised controlled trial

Tan, Ting Ting and Tan, Maw Pin and Lam, Chee Loong and Loh, Ee Chin and David Paul, Capelle and Sheriza Izwa, Zainuddin and Ang, Bin-Ting and Lim, Min Ai and Lai, Natalie Zi and Tung, Yu-Zhen and Yee, Hway Ann and Ng, Chong Guan and Ho, G. F. and See, Mee Hoong and Teh, Mei Sze and Lai, Lee Lee and 5 Ranjit Kaur, Pritam Singh and Chai, Chee Shee and Ng, Diana Leh-Ching and Tan, Seng Beng (2021) Mindful gratitude journaling: psychological distress, quality of life and suffering in advanced cancer: a randomised controlled trial. BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care (2021). pp. 1-8. ISSN ISSN 2045-4368

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Abstract

Context Numerous studies have shown that gratitude can reduce stress and improve quality of life. Objective Our study aimed to examine the effect of mindful gratitude journaling on suffering, psychological distress and quality of life of patients with advanced cancer. Methods We conducted a parallel-group, blinded, randomised controlled trial at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. Ninety-two adult patients with advanced cancer, and an overall suffering score ≥4/10 based on the Suffering Pictogram were recruited and randomly assigned to either a mindful gratitude journaling group (N=49) or a routine journaling group (N=43). Results After 1 week, there were significant reductions in the overall suffering score from the baseline in both the intervention group (mean difference in overall suffering score=−2.0, 95% CI=−2.7 to −1.4, t=−6.125, p=0.000) and the control group (mean difference in overall suffering score=−1.6, 95% CI=−2.3 to −0.8, t=−4.106, p=0.037). There were also significant improvements in the total Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score (mean difference=−3.4, 95% CI=−5.3 to −1.5, t=−3.525, p=0.000) and the total Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being score (mean difference=7.3, 95% CI=1.5 to 13.1, t=2.460, p=0.014) in the intervention group after 7 days, but not in the control group. Conclusion The results provide evidence that 7 days of mindful gratitude journaling could positively affect the state of suffering, psychological distress and quality of life of patients with advanced cancer.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: UNIMAS, University, Borneo, Malaysia, Sarawak, Kuching, Samarahan, IPTA, education, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0254 Neoplasms. Tumors. Oncology (including Cancer)
Divisions: Academic Faculties, Institutes and Centres > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Depositing User: Leh Ching
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2021 07:44
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2021 07:44
URI: http://ir.unimas.my/id/eprint/36180

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