Small Terrestrial Mammals

Chong, Yee Ling and Faisal Ali, Bin Anwarali Khan and Andrew Alek, Anak Tuen and Mohd-Azlan, Jayasilan and Nur Elfeyra Syazana, Binti Hamdan and Nurul Hasni, Binti Sukri and Nur Shyaza Faziella, Binti Mohamad Nahrawi and Qhairil Shyamri, Rosli and Julius Willian, Dee and Muhd Amsyari, Bin Morni and Badiozaman, bin Sulaiman and Beatrice Belinda, Gituen Langub (2018) Small Terrestrial Mammals. In: Gunung Santubong. Where nature meets culture. Life from Headwaters to the Coast . Natural History Publications (Borneo) Sdn. Bhd., Kota Kinabalu, UNIMAS Publisher, Sarawak Forestry Corporation Sdn Bhd, Kota Samarahan, pp. 121-124. ISBN 978-967-2008-94-1

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Abstract

The small terrestrial mammals of Gunung Santubong were documented based on feld data collected using baited cage traps and pitfall traps. Trapping was done at the foot of the mountain and along jungle trails. These areas are publicly accessible and received much human disturbance from nearby forest lodges, beach resorts and rest stations. A total of nine species of small mammals, representing three families— Soricidae (shrew), Muridae (rat), and Sciuridae (squirrel), were recorded. Of these, fve rat species from the family Muridae were captured using bananabaited cage traps. Among them, the Small Spiny Rat (Maxomys baeodon), is rare and endemic to Borneo. It was previously thought to be restricted to northern Borneo, and show a patchy distribution in highland localities in Sabah and north-eastern Sarawak. The threats to this species remain unknown. The species was previously listed as ‘Endangered’ in the IUCN Red List in 1996, and in 2017, was downlisted to ‘Data Defcient’, due to lack of threat information. Another uncommon and locally endemic rat species recorded is Chestnut-Bellied Spiny Rat (Maxomys ochraceiventer). This species was previously recorded from lower montane and dipterocarp forests, from scattered localities in northern Borneo, western Sarawak and east Kalimantan. Both rat species are small in size and have stiff spines on their bodies, which are covered with reddish to brownish fur.

Item Type: Book Chapter
Uncontrolled Keywords: mammals, species, Borneo, Gunung Santubong, dipterocarp forests, unimas, university, universiti, Borneo, Malaysia, Sarawak, Kuching, Samarahan, ipta, education, research, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak.
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QL Zoology
Divisions: Academic Faculties, Institutes and Centres > Faculty of Resource Science and Technology
Depositing User: Gani
Date Deposited: 12 Jul 2019 08:36
Last Modified: 12 Jul 2019 08:36
URI: http://ir.unimas.my/id/eprint/25816

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